Alien Trespass DVD Review

Written by James "Spez" Ferguson

DVD released by Image Entertainment



Directed by R. W. Goodwin
Written by Steven Fisher
2009, 84 Minutes, Rated PG
Released on August 11th 2009

Eric McCormack as Dr. Ted Lewis / Urp
Jenni Baird as Tammy
Dan Lauria as Chief Dawson
Robert Patrick as Vern
Jody Thompson as Lana





The 1950s were a crazy time, or so I'm told.  The Cold War was in full swing and aliens were a metaphor for communists.  Alien Trespass is a movie that harkens back to the day and age where it was rare to see a black man in a movie that wasn't a butler or a gas station attendant, but in a good way.  Although it was made in 2009, the people behind the film claim it's a long lost movie from the now defunct Goodwin Films in 1957.  Of course it was produced by the "grandfather" of director R.W. Goodwin and it stars the "grandfather" of Eric McCormack.  

Alien Trespass is a low budget alien movie made in the present day to look and feel like it was a low budget alien movie produced 50 years ago.  With the exception of a few CGI shots of the UFO cruising through space, everything from the cheesy sets to the driving shots with the car not actually moving makes it look like an old sci-fi flick.  If you can get into this, then you'll have a good time with this movie.



The film starts out with a UFO crash landing outside a small California town.  Urp, an intergalactic marshal, was transporting a vicious Ghota when his ship malfunctioned.  Now the Ghota is on the loose and he has to stop it before it feeds and multiplies.  To blend in with the locals, he possesses the body of local scientist Dr. Ted Lewis (Eric McCormack, Will & Grace) and hunts down the creature.  He's looked at as a crazy person, and rightfully so, by everyone in town.  Vern (Robert Patrick, X-Files, Terminator 2) thinks the whole thing is a big joke as does his boss Chief Dawson (Dan Lauria, the Dad from Wonder Years!) until people start disappearing with nothing to show for it except a gooey puddle of water.  

Urp is only seen for a few minutes but he resembles a slimmer version of the robot Gort from The Day the Earth Stood Still (I'm not talking about Keanu Reeves).  Meanwhile, the Ghota looks like someone put a purple rubber sack over an actor and drew a big red eye on the front, then just had them run around.  It looks a lot better than the aliens in some of those old sci-fi movies but it still looks ridiculous.

Alien Trespass has all the makings of a cult film made out of its time.  This is a movie that if produced in the 1950s would have ended up on Mystery Science Theater 3000.  Fortunately it's not a bad flick so it wouldn't earn such harsh criticism.  It's actually a lot of fun.   It's not a movie that's "so bad, it's good."



Video and Audio:


The audio is presented in crisp Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround Sound, but it doesn't get much of a workout.  This could have been released as a 2.0 track and no one would have really noticed.  The images are very clear on the DVD version with the colors bright and vibrant, fitting in with the time and setting of the film.



Special Features:


There's an introduction to the film by R.W. Goodwin and Eric McCormack that sets up the premise of the "lost film" pretty well.  There are a handful of featurettes, interviews and trailers too, but most of them repeat what the intro does but with less success.  In fact some of them actually contain duplicate footage which is just silly.








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About The Author
James Ferguson
Lord of the Funny Books
James has a 2nd grade reading level and, as a result, only reads books with pictures. Horror is his 5th favorite genre right after romantic comedy and just before silent films. No one knows why he's here, but he won't leave.
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